There are numerous options of symptomatic treatments available, coming in a range of dosage-forms:

  • Nasal sprays
  • Eye drops
  • Oral medications
  • Inhalers

Symptomatic treatments

Symptomatic drugs are often prescribed by physicians as first-line treatment to reduce the intensity of the symptoms and fight the inflammation caused by the allergy. However, despite their recognised efficacy on allergic reactions, symptomatic drugs do not treat the root cause of an allergy.

Symptomatic treatments

Symptomatic drugs are effective and may reduce the severity of allergy symptoms, though these medications have no long-lasting effect when treatment is ended (source: www.allergyuk.org last accessed on May 11, 2016; Bousquet J, et al. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) 2008. Allergy 2008;63(S86):8-160).

Symptomatic drugs are often prescribed by physicians as first-line treatment to reduce the intensity of the symptoms and fight the inflammation caused by the allergy.

However, despite their recognized efficacy on allergic reactions, symptomatic drugs do not treat the root cause of an allergy. Their effects last as long as they are taken but present no long-term benefits.

Most symptomatic treatments can be found over-the-counter which work in different ways to target the different allergy symptoms. For example:

  • Antihistamines work by blocking the action of histamine, a chemical released by your immune system during an allergic reaction that causes swelling and itching. Available as oral medications, nasal sprays, eye drops. (source : www.allergyuk.org (last accessed on May 11, 2016).
  • Decongestants are used to help ease a blocked or stuffy nose (nasal congestion). They may be helpful for congestion caused by various conditions, including allergic rhinitis.

Available as nose drops or nasal sprays and oral medication. Decongestant nose drops or nasal sprays should not be used for more than seven days at a time. (source : www.patient.info ; last accessed on May 11, 2016)

  • Corticosteroids help to reduce inflammation; for patients suffering from allergic rhinitis and asthma. Available as nasal sprays, drops, oral medication and inhalers. Usually only available with a prescription and must be carefully monitored by your doctor. (source : www.allergyuk.org (last accessed on May 11, 2016); GINA 2016. www.ginasthma.org (last accessed on May 11, 2016).

Did you know?

59% of allergy sufferers report that nasal congestion impacts job performance (source : Canonica GW, et al. Patient perceptions of allergic rhinitis and quality of life: findings from a survey conducted in Europe and the United States. World Allergy Organ J 2008;1(9):138-44).

More than 1 in 2 people with respiratory allergies will never consult a doctor (source: Demoly P, et al. Validation of a self-questionnaire for assessing the control of allergic rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy 2011;41:860-8).

Work productivity drops by 20% on bad allergy days (Meltzer EO, et al. Allergic rhinitis substantially impacts patient quality of life: findings from the Nasal Allergy Survey Assessing Limitations. J Fam Pract 2012;61(S2):5-10.)